An Unexpected Journey of Growth

My name is Jennifer Holt. I began my journey with the Merriam Insurance Agency in 2009 as a Professional Liability Account Manager. During my years of service at Merriam, I have worn several hats. My responsibilities have ranged from customer service to department management and development and marketing of an...

Introducing the Title Industry Protector

Over the last twenty years we have seen many changes in the title E&O marketplace. As an independent insurance broker, we have worked with many different carriers to find the best product for our clients. As companies entered and exited the market, we found different nuances in policy forms that...

Do You Know Your Retro Date?

The retroactive date on your policy specifies the earliest point in time that your insurance policy will provide coverage. This is also known as your prior acts coverage. Your professional liability policy is written on a claims made basis including a retroactive date. This means, in order for coverage to apply, the claim must be made and reported to the insurance carrier during the policy period and must have occurred after the retroactive date on your policy.

Claims-Made Policies

Some recent inquiries have made us aware that it may be time to review the nuances of claims-made policy forms once again. Here is how Occurrence Policies respond to claims, as opposed to how claims-made policies respond. It is important to understand the differences. Occurrence Policies This is the insurance coverage form with which most people are familiar. Most Homeowner, Auto and Commercial General Liability policies are written on an “occurrence” basis. Coverage is triggered

Time Keeps Ticking

Could this happen to you? Most would say, no, but it happened to one of our more experienced clients, and it wasn’t discovered until years had passed. A closing took place in upstate NY in 1999. During the transaction it was noted that in addition to a mortgage, there was a home equity loan that had been taken out on the home being sold. At the closing it was shown that the home equity loan had been paid off, and a zero balance was due to this secondary lender.

Admitted v NonAdmitted

When receiving a carrier’s quote, inevitably the question is asked “is it admitted or non-admitted?” We always ask it, but do we really understand what the differences are between admitted and non-admitted carriers? And do we know what happens when admitted v. non-admitted carriers go into liquidation? And most importantly, what should the client know? The designation of an insurance company by a state’s Insurance Commissioner as “admitted” may seem to give the company a stamp of authority, however, this designation is